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Interesting Nitro Rumor (1 Viewer)

Tom Slick

Nitro Member
It's crazy that we all keep having this same conversation about the cost of NHRA professional nitro racing over and over again, yet the NHRA essentially does nothing to change the financial burden of the sport. So many good ideas get floated around forums just like this one that seem to fall on def ears of the powers that be. The NHRA is very hypocritical in my opinion. Think about it, aside from safety, the NHRA was founded on speed and performance. In this age of speeds approaching 340 mph in 1000' the NHRA is constantly whispering that they want to slow the cars down, but they rarely do anything about it. I believe their hypocrisy in this is because they continue to market the NHRA with high speeds and explosions. They don't want oil downs and carnage, but they advertise the daylights out of it. They penalize race teams with points deductions and fines, but replay the incidents over and over again and turn them into a 30 minute highlight reel and use the incidents as advertising. So the NHRA wants to exploit the racers by allowing them to run as hard as possible, fine them when something goes wrong and advertise the heck out of it.

If the NHRA was serious about slowing cars down and reducing costs for the race teams they could do it. Instead they just keep beating the horse from one side of the country to the other without doing a thing. Like Chris Cook mentioned above, F1 let race teams know about rules changes 2-3 years in advance. The NHRA can easily do the same.

Below is a list of cost savings ideas that I have:

1. Reduce the number of days for a national event. A national event can be ran on a Friday- Saturday for night events, or Saturday-Sunday for day events. Reducing a full day reduces a full day of lodging, meals, etc. It can also reduce a single qualifying run as qualifying would be 3 rounds instead of 4, also saving money. Plus having 3 qualifying passes may insentivize teams to not sit out a round or two as some of the lower funded teams are currently doing. Over a 24 race series the elimination of 24 passes and 24 days of lodging is a nice chuck of change that would be saved. And now with the problem of teams running a limited schedule and still making the Countdown, teams would be more likely to hit all of the events with the savings they have from less qualifying laps and less days at an event.

2. I know that this was done in the past, but reduce the amount of days that teams are allowed to test. It seems that well funded teams run the Monday Nationals several times a year which also costs money. Reducing test days will help with leveling the playing field as well, as lower budgeted teams will not be at as much of a disadvantage to the well funded teams that can afford to test throughout the season.

3. Refine the schedule so that the tour makes more sense for miles traveled. Why on earth have we always started the season in Pomona, head to Phoenix, then head as far East as possible to Gainsville, only to come all the way back to Las Vegas? Wouldn't it make more sense to run Pomona, Phoenix and Las Vegas before making the trek to Florida.

4. I don't claim to know all of the inner workings of a nitro burning Hemi, but I do know that there are a bunch of really smart people that have ideas on how to reduce costs and slow the cars down a little bit which is the goal. Reduce blower overdrive, reduce fuel volume, reduce spark, etc. Giving teams a reasonable amount of time to make changes to the combination, again 1-3 years would help with current parts inventories and future inventories.

I'm sure there is much more that can be added to this and I've rattled on long enough, but it is time for a positive change for the NHRA's future and they are the ONLY ones that can do it.
 

Huge

Nitro Member
I noticed this year that the Monster Supercross teams raced in Anaheim Ca then raced the next weekend in St Louis Mo and then came back to Anaheim to race the next weekend.
 

Tom Slick

Nitro Member
I noticed this year that the Monster Supercross teams raced in Anaheim Ca then raced the next weekend in St Louis Mo and then came back to Anaheim to race the next weekend.
I saw that too. I can only guess that it was because of Stadium availability. Definitely didn't make any sense.
 

zippy

Nitro Member
I saw that too. I can only guess that it was because of Stadium availability. Definitely didn't make any sense.
It is due to the availability of Angel Stadium while the grass has been removed and the dirt brought in. Between supercross they usually run two Monster Jam events as well. They lay all new sod in February so it's rooted and ready for professional baseball in mid to late march. The deal with AMA is with the city of Anaheim, and it might all change if the sale of the stadium is completed with Arte Moreno.
 

Sean D, shondoo

Nitro Member
I think there are a certain number of folks that have been lulled into a false sense of security because the participation numbers seem to be improving, but the fact still remains the sport is being supported by very few owners when it comes to the nitro classes, as well as a few more owners, but fewer suppliers of competitive power in Pro Stock. When the withdrawal of a single owner/engine supplier can affect the percentage of field size that this sport currently has competing it's a problem that can't continue to be overlooked.

I've said it before and I'll pound the horse again; I just don't get the argument about all the inventory. These teams have struggled for years to get primary level funding to run these cars full-tilt, literally from year-to-year. The business plan of running on the professional level in the NHRA isn't that strong as it is, so I just can't make sense of holding a bunch of inventory when you may not know your plans for each coming season. And I know the wealthy folks that are just hobbying aren't necessarily affected by year-to-year sponsor/marketing partner issues, but that isn't any better of a business plan, especially as it pertains to the long-term health of the sport itself and THAT'S what needs to be worried about, not the very few who's spending is out of control resulting in a bunch of excess parts on the shelf. So if there are changes that need to be made for the overall health/survival of the sport, get it in motion and give the necessary amount of lead-time if need be.

As has been mentioned, the low-hanging fruit would be reducing the number of events. Many of the teams have come forward and verified travel costs as one of, if not the biggest issue that hits the bottom line of the operational expense sheet, so it's probably time to take a hard look at that along with the logistical end of things when it comes to running rigs back and forth across the country. I realize Mother Nature likely plays a role in that, but if there's a cut in the schedule I'm sure that part could be adjusted/improved as well.

Sean D
 
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SoCal Racer

Nitro Member
I don't see why the top nitro teams would not want to come up with a solution to reduce costs.
I'll tell you why (WARNING: opinion ahead). Drag racing is an awesome and extreme sport that attracts the type of team owners whose ego is only only surpassed by the depth of their pockets. Obviously it makes no sense to them or anyone else to spend $2-3 million per year chasing a championship that only pays $500,000.....but that's not why they do it. They do it in part for the love of the sport, but more for bragging rights - "I'm the baddest in the baddest of sports." I'm not passing judgement or calling anyone bad people, but rather saying as long as you have a bunch of guys wealthy enough to do it, they are going to spend whatever it takes to get that big trophy.
 

Rat

Nitro Member
I'll tell you why (WARNING: opinion ahead). Drag racing is an awesome and extreme sport that attracts the type of team owners whose ego is only only surpassed by the depth of their pockets. Obviously it makes no sense to them or anyone else to spend $2-3 million per year chasing a championship that only pays $500,000.....but that's not why they do it. They do it in part for the love of the sport, but more for bragging rights - "I'm the baddest in the baddest of sports." I'm not passing judgement or calling anyone bad people, but rather saying as long as you have a bunch of guys wealthy enough to do it, they are going to spend whatever it takes to get that big trophy.
Cold. Hard. Facts. Is there a true ROI for 3 mil? Maybe if you win 60-70 rounds a year.
 

mick

Nitro Member
Cold. Hard. Facts. Is there a true ROI for 3 mil? Maybe if you win 60-70 rounds a year.
i would think it depends on the sponsor. a ROI is not necessarily a monetary figure. recruiting and entertaining via hospitality can indirectly effect a company's bottom line; so sometimes it mite
not be how much did a company make by sponsoring, but how much they have retained by sponsoring. customer relations if you will. that being said, there sure are few companies that see
nhra nitro classes as a viable tool, and that is sad. look no further than DSR & t. schumacher's inability to put a program together. there will always be the 'next' wealthy business owner who genuinely
loves the sport and becomes involved for a series of years, and if we're lucky it'll be someone like dick levi...........and here is something really cool. i think 2020 will be the 21st year
for Tim and LRS, and 10 years for Tim and Ford. that is huge. has Tim won a championship? does that make Tim's program a failure? on the contrary, his is arguably the most successful nitro program
out there. Wilk's Warriors. look no further than this team, who probably doesn't spend as much as other teams, as a model of success in the nhra nitro classes.
 

Dragracer

Nitro Member
I noticed this year that the Monster Supercross teams raced in Anaheim Ca then raced the next weekend in St Louis Mo and then came back to Anaheim to race the next weekend.
That's been the way their schedule for years. They are part of Feld Intertainment which also has owns the Monster Truck Series. They set up a stadium like Anaheim for the Monster trucks and the next weekend Supercross uses it. That way Feld gets two races at each stadium without having to set up the stadium each time. The season starts off with the Supercross at Anaheim, the following weekend it's Monster trucks. To get even more for their bucks they then bring Supercross back to Anaheim. They get 3 times at Anaheim and only have to set it all up each time.
 

Dragracer

Nitro Member
It is due to the availability of Angel Stadium while the grass has been removed and the dirt brought in. Between supercross they usually run two Monster Jam events as well. They lay all new sod in February so it's rooted and ready for professional baseball in mid to late march. The deal with AMA is with the city of Anaheim, and it might all change if the sale of the stadium is completed with Arte Moreno.
The Monster Jam and Supercross are both owned by Feld Intertainment. That is why you see them running on consecutive weekends at the same track.
Feld Intertainment also owns Ringling Bros Circus
Even if Artie is successful in buying Anaheim he is not going to stop Supercross and Monster Jam, it brings in way too much money too stop having them.
 

Huge

Nitro Member
That's been the way their schedule for years. They are part of Feld Intertainment which also has owns the Monster Truck Series. They set up a stadium like Anaheim for the Monster trucks and the next weekend Supercross uses it. That way Feld gets two races at each stadium without having to set up the stadium each time. The season starts off with the Supercross at Anaheim, the following weekend it's Monster trucks. To get even more for their bucks they then bring Supercross back to Anaheim. They get 3 times at Anaheim and only have to set it all up each time.
You are correct that they split the two Anaheim Supercross races with a Monster truck show. But for the past few years they would do the west coast events before heading to the mid west. But this year they did Anaheim 1 and then went to St Louis and then came back and did Anaheim 2. Last year they did 17 races and ended in Las Vegas in May but this year they are doing 18 races and ending in Carson Ca in October. It looks like they dropped Houston Tx but added St Louis Mo and Carson Ca. Here is a link to their 2019 and 2020 schedule.
 

tom

Nitro Member
NHRA needs a Feld Entertainment to handle and promote the sport. Monster truck and AMS supercross both get 50,000 plus fans at prices from $30.(nosebleed seats) into the hundreds for the good ones. Drag racing needs excitement in promotion (Bill Doner rest in peace). Excitement will attract sponsors. Is it really feasible that 3 to 5 Million a year is a huge mountain to potential sponsors? UBER is losing 10 Million A DAY



























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Jim

Nitro Member
It's great to "blue sky" about fewer days (of events) and fewer events but, would crew salaries (for those who get paid) be reduced?
I THINK (I don't really KNOW much) simplifying the motor specs might save some money and - more important - bring some "semi-pros" to the party. During the hey day of Drag Racing (ie 32 / 64 car fields) very few teams had big buck sponsors. I know, you can't get a replacement Hemi at the junkyard anymore, but nearly one-off billet widgets cost real money and keep the fun racer on the sidelines.
 

Butch

Nitro Member
I took my Grandson to a Monster truck thing. If they had 50,000 in attendance, 35,000 was under 12yrs of age.
When my daughter raced MX we would go to the Phoenix and Vegas races, I swore I was the oldest in attendance.
 

sammi

Nitro Member
I think NHRA and NASCAR are sitting and watching F1's bold move for 2021. If the F1 model works, I truly believe this will embolden the followers who run the other sanctioning bodies to finally move. If not, more of the same.
BTW-F1's 2021 plans were spearheaded by a racer, not a fearful business school attendee. Ross Braun, who had massive success with Beneton, Ferrari and Mercedes is now calling shots in F1. This is kinda like what we would have if Austin Coil, Don Garlits or Kenny Bernstein ran NHRA.
 

Nunz

Nitro Member
I think NHRA and NASCAR are sitting and watching F1's bold move for 2021. If the F1 model works, I truly believe this will embolden the followers who run the other sanctioning bodies to finally move. If not, more of the same.
BTW-F1's 2021 plans were spearheaded by a racer, not a fearful business school attendee. Ross Braun, who had massive success with Beneton, Ferrari and Mercedes is now calling shots in F1. This is kinda like what we would have if Austin Coil, Don Garlits or Kenny Bernstein ran NHRA.
Mark what is the F1 move that they may be watching?
 
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