"Connie 636 you are cleared to land..." (1 Viewer)

mick

Nitro Member
this is a great thread. cliff, your job sounds really cool, one that i would want someday.......in the late 90's a plane manufacturer sponsored the brainerd event for one year.
the VisionAire Northstar Nationals. the sponsor on doug winter's chevelle PM is Stinar, a MN based aviation ground support equipment manufacturer.
 

Randy

Nitro Member
We need to start a new thread, "How many racers are pilots". That would be interesting.
Randy, which is more fun, flying or driving the race car?

Driving a race car was fun, but as of yet I don't have a pilot's license. On the bucket list, though! Grew up just north of the Fullerton Airport. Saw a lot of neat stuff come and go.
 

Ramjet

Nitro Member
We need to start a new thread, "How many racers are pilots". That would be interesting.
Randy, which is more fun, flying or driving the race car?
Did the Ground School. Started the lessons but then life happened. It is not really the same thing. Flying is nice in that you get to go somewhere but there is no competition in the experience. Driving a Race Car is not all about the Rush or the sensory overload - or at least it shouldn't be. It is about the competition involved. At Bonneville driving the Streamliner was very much like flying. It takes concentration and awareness but you are not there to specifically beat someone. I have driven a car at Bonneville faster than I have flown a plane or driven a Dragster - Altered - Boat Etc. but there is no sensory overload involved. Flying a small plane is like going on a sight seeing highway trip except for taking off and landing. If your competition in a plane is defiying gravity it doesn't seem to be all that exciting.
 

Cliff

Nitro Member
What about airplane racing? I've see videos of those things - prop jobs that cost about the same as a nitro operation. Around 400 MPH and they can get pretty hairy. Kinda like an airplane version of AA/FA.

 

HEMI6point1

Nitro Member
One of the Kalitta 747's gets a fire alert in the cargo bay. "7 souls on board." Listen to it to the end to hear the outcome. Connie may not be pleased after finding out they dumped over 17,000 gallons of Jet A at $2.46 a gallon.


I'm no professional pilot, but (courtesy of watching nearly every video on TheFlightChannel) planes have a maximum landing weight they need to adhere to. Connie may get pissed at dumping fuel but it's either that or landing too heavy and possibly losing the aircraft (and lives).
 

Randy

Nitro Member
I'm no professional pilot, but (courtesy of watching nearly every video on TheFlightChannel) planes have a maximum landing weight they need to adhere to. Connie may get pissed at dumping fuel but it's either that or landing too heavy and possibly losing the aircraft (and lives).

I think the concern here is landing with a fire on board with 135,000 pounds of fuel. BTW, I have watched a lot of videos on the TheFlightChannel. Good stuff.
 

BaldyLochs

Nitro Member
Glad they got it on the ground. The tragic ValuJet 592 DC9 lasted something like 12 minutes TOTAL time from roll out to disappearing from radar outside of Miami. No bag bin fire sensors onboard that one; although in the wake of the accident they did become mandatory. As terrible as that accident was, it’s very intriguing. Very haunting, very sickening to go through the CVR recordings on YouTube and read the full CVR transcript of the entire flight, minute by minute. Swiss cheese effect. Human error brought that thing down, and the resulting FAA/NTSB shakeup…. Very good to study if you have an interest. There’s a couple really good and factual documentaries out there on it; and some really bad BS ones too.
 
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dr flames

Nitro Member
I think the concern here is landing with a fire on board with 135,000 pounds of fuel. BTW, I have watched a lot of videos on the TheFlightChannel. Good stuff.
In the 70,s I worked as a lineman at vegas airport, I was told by Mechanics that 747s were landed by computer, the pilots would have to land one every so many hours to keep there rating, they used a plane for just that because most of the time even slight landing miscalculations would cause enough damage to warrant complete overhaul of landing gear, I think you are right that landing with that much fuel and weigh and possible gear failure would be hugely dangerous
 
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.

Nitro Member
I'm sure you aviation nerds (like me) have heard this before but this may be new for some of you. The pilots of Kalitta 66 became Hypoxic and they were struggling to control the airplane. Notice how the pilot struggles to get basic sentences out of his mouth. Once air traffic controllers figured out what was happening, they told Kalitta 66 to descend and within seconds the pilots started talking and sounding normal again. Notice the difference in their voices after descending. This was a very dangerous situation. It's amazing these hypoxic pilots were able to comprehend and execute instructions from ATC. This is the same type of thing that caused Payne Stewart's Learjet to crash... Everyone on-board became hypoxic and the plane flew until it ran out of fuel and crashed in a farm field. The crash killed everyone on-board.

I first heard the Kalitta 66 audio when I toured Minneapolis Center (ARTCC) about 10 years ago. I was sitting in a conference room full of air traffic controllers and commercial pilots (I am neither) and pretty much everyone in the room understood what was going on with no explanation... except me. lolol. However, one of the controllers was kind enough to explain it to me.

It's very impressive the Kalitta Pilots made it safely through that ordeal.

 
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