RUMOR MILL - X-GAMES SUPERSTAR PASTRANA HEADED TO TOP FUEL? (1 Viewer)

TSK

Staff member
Nitro Member
Even if Pastrana doesn’t get more involved with a team, this kind of publicity is nothing but good for the sport.
What I wouldn’t give to drop the hammer on a blown fuel car.
When I was still with The Invader, I begged Glenn to let me try a 60 ft blast in the seat. But he wouldn’t let me.
However he did let me warm up his ‘68 Barracuda A/FX with a blown fuel 392 Hemi.
 
There will be at least 3 other videos coming out in addition to the one above (including one I'm producing), but I wanted to comment in the meantime on how wild it was to witness someone of Travis Pastrana's stature attempt to drive a Top Fuel car. While he did not have the experience that many of today's drivers had when they attempted to make their first runs in a fuel car, he had a tremendous amount of help. Alex Laughlin, Scott Palmer, Leah Pruett, and Tony Stewart spent 3 hours with him on Sunday night in the pit area and on the track in a rental car going over procedures, and then another 2 hours the following morning. For a car that's driven best by keeping everything as simple, consistent, and little driver input as possible, it was a reminder of just how complicated it can be to do properly.

Travis would be the first person to tell you that he struggled in a lot of areas (and he'll do so in the videos). It would honestly be unfair to critique his performance because he just flat out did not have the proper amount of experience required to take a lot of the variables that he encountered out of the equation for the 2 attempts he made yesterday. While a lot of people have not been as pumped that he just jumped straight into the top class in the sport, that was his prerogative and the results destroyed the notion that you can just throw anyone into one of these cars out of nowhere and they'll be fine right out of the gate. That's the lamest narrative in drag racing in my opinion, and it's not true at all. It's disrespectful to those who have made it to those cars and the preparations they had to make to learn to properly pilot one. It's absolutely attainable to make driving one second nature, but it's because you've taken the time to master the procedures and you've made laps.

As much as Travis progressed as a driver each time he was in the car, the amount of respect and admiration he gained for what nitro drag racing is was at a whole other level. For a man that has done some of the wildest things many of us have ever witnessed in a car or on a bike, he had never experienced anything remotely close to what he was a part of yesterday. He was awestruck and more nervous after the first hit, and it's a reminder of just how much larger than life these cars really are. At the end of the day he was genuinely appreciative of the opportunity with hopes to come back in the future if the invite was there.

One additional note to add that I don't think is being discussed enough amongst the fans of the sport is how invested Tony Stewart is in drag racing — and I'm not referring to the financial aspect of it. I could not have been more impressed with the knowledge he was relaying from his experiences so far, his ability to break down each run, and his overall intensity when it came to the nuances and technicalities of how to manage every aspect of being in a nitro car. This guy has fully embraced the sport of drag racing and on multiple occasions reinforced to Travis how people involved in other forms of motorsports have no idea how much there is to our sport and the steep learning curve there is to be successful. Very cool to witness first hand, and further legitimacy to the sport that we are so passionate about.
 
Last edited:

StockersRock

Nitro Member
There will be at least 3 other videos coming out in addition to the one above (including one I'm producing), but I wanted to comment in the meantime on how wild it was to witness someone of Travis Pastrana's stature attempt to drive a Top Fuel car. While he did not have the experience that many of today's drivers had when they attempted to make their first runs in a fuel car, he had a tremendous amount of help. Alex Laughlin, Scott Palmer, Leah Pruett, and Tony Stewart spent 3 hours with him on Sunday night in the pit area and on the track in a rental car going over procedures, and then another 2 hours the following morning. For a car that's driven best by keeping everything as simple, consistent, and little driver input as possible, it was a reminder of just how complicated it can be to do properly.

Travis would be the first person to tell you that he struggled in a lot of areas (and he'll do so in the videos). It would honestly be unfair to critique his performance because he just flat out did not have the proper amount of experience required to take a lot of the variables that he encountered out of the equation for the 2 attempts he made yesterday. While a lot of people have not been as pumped that he just jumped straight into the top class in the sport, that was his prerogative and the results destroyed the notion that you can just throw anyone into one of these cars out of nowhere and they'll be fine right out of the gate. That's the lamest narrative in drag racing in my opinion, and it's not true at all. It's disrespectful to those who have made it to those cars and the preparations they had to make to learn to properly pilot one. It's absolutely attainable to make driving one second nature, but it's because you've taken the time to master the procedures and you've made laps.

As much as Travis progressed as a driver each time he was in the car, the amount of respect and admiration he gained for what nitro drag racing is was at a whole other level. For a man that has done some of the wildest things many of us have ever witnessed in a car or on a bike, he had never experienced anything remotely close to what he was a part of yesterday. He was awestruck and more nervous after the first hit, and it's a reminder of just how much larger than life these cars really are. At the end of the day he was genuinely appreciative of the opportunity with hopes to come back in the future if the invite was there.

One additional note to add that I don't think is being discussed enough amongst the fans of the sport is how invested Tony Stewart is in drag racing — and I'm not referring to the financial aspect of it. I could not have been more impressed with the knowledge he was relaying from his experiences so far, his ability to break down each run, and his overall intensity when it came to the nuances and technicalities of how to manage every aspect of being in a nitro car. This guy has fully embraced the sport of drag racing and on multiple occasions reinforced to Travis how people involved in other forms of motorsports have no idea how much there is to our sport and the steep learning curve there is to be successful. Very cool to witness first hand, and further legitimacy to the sport that we are so passionate about.
Great thoughts and Information, Corey. I think many people mistake Travis for being a guy that is arrogant and thinks "How hard can it be?" at his attempts at different disciplines, particularly anyone that WANTS to be a naysayer. The guy has more than enough money to do whatever he wants, and that's pretty much what he does. But, I've never seen it come off in any way other than with respect to what he is currently trying to do. Even with his NASCAR stint, he was humbled by it and gave all the props to the people that do it at the highest levels consistently. I would have expected nothing less than what you described here.

And regarding Tony Stewart, he's full of pure racing talent. But to sustain that with such success as he has, it takes just what you described to be the multi-discipline champion that he is.
 

the guy

Nitro Member
There will be at least 3 other videos coming out in addition to the one above (including one I'm producing), but I wanted to comment in the meantime on how wild it was to witness someone of Travis Pastrana's stature attempt to drive a Top Fuel car. While he did not have the experience that many of today's drivers had when they attempted to make their first runs in a fuel car, he had a tremendous amount of help. Alex Laughlin, Scott Palmer, Leah Pruett, and Tony Stewart spent 3 hours with him on Sunday night in the pit area and on the track in a rental car going over procedures, and then another 2 hours the following morning. For a car that's driven best by keeping everything as simple, consistent, and little driver input as possible, it was a reminder of just how complicated it can be to do properly.

Travis would be the first person to tell you that he struggled in a lot of areas (and he'll do so in the videos). It would honestly be unfair to critique his performance because he just flat out did not have the proper amount of experience required to take a lot of the variables that he encountered out of the equation for the 2 attempts he made yesterday. While a lot of people have not been as pumped that he just jumped straight into the top class in the sport, that was his prerogative and the results destroyed the notion that you can just throw anyone into one of these cars out of nowhere and they'll be fine right out of the gate. That's the lamest narrative in drag racing in my opinion, and it's not true at all. It's disrespectful to those who have made it to those cars and the preparations they had to make to learn to properly pilot one. It's absolutely attainable to make driving one second nature, but it's because you've taken the time to master the procedures and you've made laps.

As much as Travis progressed as a driver each time he was in the car, the amount of respect and admiration he gained for what nitro drag racing is was at a whole other level. For a man that has done some of the wildest things many of us have ever witnessed in a car or on a bike, he had never experienced anything remotely close to what he was a part of yesterday. He was awestruck and more nervous after the first hit, and it's a reminder of just how much larger than life these cars really are. At the end of the day he was genuinely appreciative of the opportunity with hopes to come back in the future if the invite was there.

One additional note to add that I don't think is being discussed enough amongst the fans of the sport is how invested Tony Stewart is in drag racing — and I'm not referring to the financial aspect of it. I could not have been more impressed with the knowledge he was relaying from his experiences so far, his ability to break down each run, and his overall intensity when it came to the nuances and technicalities of how to manage every aspect of being in a nitro car. This guy has fully embraced the sport of drag racing and on multiple occasions reinforced to Travis how people involved in other forms of motorsports have no idea how much there is to our sport and the steep learning curve there is to be successful. Very cool to witness first hand, and further legitimacy to the sport that we are so passionate about.
Thats about the most honest and articulate narrative to any post Ive ever seen on this, or any other website/forum...including and especially my replys and posts.

Many great points made, without being diaparaging or "fluff piece" to anyone involved.

Would have been a bucket list item for me to be there for the day; but what a great synopsis of what happened in real life, in addition to what the videos show.

Maybe some of the critics of how easy it is to drive a drag car...from A stock Automatic all the way to TF will finally see the fact that not everyone can jump in one of these beasts and be successful...with some exeptions (see Del Worsham, Scott, Britt, Stevie, et al) and be champs...no matter how much money you have, or who your dad is.

Mad props to Travis (who Ive looked up to since I was 19 when he jumped into the Bay) for stepping out of his comfort zone and Scott Palmer, Alex Laughin, their crew, and especially all the lawyers that have to keep TP from certain death, for making such a cool thing happen come to fruition.

Thanks again for the post.
 

cknight

Nitro Member
Thats about the most honest and articulate narrative to any post Ive ever seen on this, or any other website/forum...including and especially my replys and posts.

Many great points made, without being diaparaging or "fluff piece" to anyone involved.

Would have been a bucket list item for me to be there for the day; but what a great synopsis of what happened in real life, in addition to what the videos show.

Maybe some of the critics of how easy it is to drive a drag car...from A stock Automatic all the way to TF will finally see the fact that not everyone can jump in one of these beasts and be successful...with some exeptions (see Del Worsham, Scott, Britt, Stevie, et al) and be champs...no matter how much money you have, or who your dad is.

Mad props to Travis (who Ive looked up to since I was 19 when he jumped into the Bay) for stepping out of his comfort zone and Scott Palmer, Alex Laughin, their crew, and especially all the lawyers that have to keep TP from certain death, for making such a cool thing happen come to fruition.

Thanks again for the post.
As far as "just jumping in", Del did, but the others you mentioned had much previous experience in the alcohol classes.
 
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