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Larry Dixon's two-seater...

#21
Okay- then how about doing "warm ups" and idling only (with passengers paying to sit in it)? NHRA don't want it on the property - no problem; Larry sets up across the street from the track at a local business - like an auto parts store, wal-mart parking lot or what have you. The local business pays him show money; it also drives people to the business who's property he's parked in front of. You'd also want to do it around a national event weekend - but then that drives sales fof NHRA tickets - so NHRA wins. Not only that, he could have guest drivers show up for an hour, get an autograph from them, sit in the car with them..... Man there's just got to be a way to make something like this work.... just for us fans if nothing else.
 
#22
Okay- then how about doing "warm ups" and idling only (with passengers paying to sit in it)? NHRA don't want it on the property - no problem; Larry sets up across the street from the track at a local business - like an auto parts store, wal-mart parking lot or what have you. The local business pays him show money; it also drives people to the business who's property he's parked in front of. You'd also want to do it around a national event weekend - but then that drives sales fof NHRA tickets - so NHRA wins. Not only that, he could have guest drivers show up for an hour, get an autograph from them, sit in the car with them..... Man there's just got to be a way to make something like this work.... just for us fans if nothing else.
I could get into that. Sitting in the cockpit behind a big name driver on 2-way radios, (whether it's Dixon or somebody else they have come in as guests) during a standard warm-up, complete with a couple of throttle whacks..........................yeah, that would be pretty bad ass.

Sean D
 

Sandman

Nitro Member
#23
Very true, they do make the rules. However, some of your examples are not really accurate. Jet cars never ran what today's T/F cars run speed-wise and I still remember NHRA's idea of exhibition cars as filler from a few years ago at Sears Point. They had local celebrities running rental cars while waiting for the final round. It took over an hour and was boring as hell. By comparison, when Pinks came to town in the same year, they had Bob Bunker's incredible '55, a couple other west coast door slammers and a couple jet dragsters running as hour long filler between races. NOBODY left their seat for that. NHRA has no clue how to promote the best racing on earth and for that they should be ashamed of themselves. You don't need nitro in the tank to please fans, look at the current craze of no prep racing. Yes, it's stupid not to use traction compound, but I'd bet the attraction is that the cars actually look like what they are! It is for me. Some hillbillys from Oklahoma figured out nobody cares about cartoon cars but the suits in Glendora can't? Same with people, fans care about their heroes and want someone they can relate to. Larry Dixon is racing history, both from his accomplishments and his dad's. Same with Mike Dunn. Yet how much time did NHRA spend working with either of them to benefit the fans interest? My guess is not much. Drag racing was founded on outside the box thinking, yet there's been no innovative cars in years. Look at cars like Swamp Rat 30, Swamp Rat 14, Gary Ormsby's Streamliner, Jim Dunn's rear engine F/C and tell me I'm wrong. More recently, look at Rick Santo's SBC T/AD, it dominated, then it was outlawed. Can't have any original thinking. I realize this has little or nothing to do with Dixon's car, but it's just how I see NHRA strong-arming creativity. The thing wasn't used in competition, hell there's an Indy car just like it, plus the Richard Petty thing in Vegas, so what's the big deal? Just my opinion, I could be wrong...
 

Nick Name

Nitro Member
#24
I remember back in 1971 Art Arfrons built a two seat jet powered dragster to do the same thing Larry is doing. Unfortunately the first time he ran it with a passenger they crashed and the passenger was killed. I certainly hope nothing like that ever happens with Larry and his two seater. Even though he is not running under NHRA sanction if anything were to happen it would reflect on all drag racing negatively and nhra would probably be affected in some way.

Randy, I have been thinking of all the variables in doing this venture. With your experience I would like to pick your brain a little. In T/F and F/C the car balance is critical. Also, the chassis rules are very specific in the rules surrounding the driver cage and the way the car should separate in a crash. These rules were put together using many years of both experience and smarts. Larry's car has changed the balance, added substantial weight and doubled the size of the driver capsule which are major untested changes. What do you think.
Not the first run. Others did get rides including Tommy Ivo.
 

none

Nitro Member
#27
Can you blame him? NHRA apparently could not care less about anyone not on the starting line at any given time. You see any mention worth worrying about when any of our sport's heroes passed recently? Glidden, McEwen, etc barely are worth the sanctioning bodies time. So why should Larry (or you or I) care about what they think or do? I think it's funny that a sport that started out to get kids off the street has no room or tolerance for anyone that doesn't fit in their corporate box. I'll still go occasionally to see nitro cars run because I love 'em, but I don't worry about their politics, policies or points structures. I also don't ever allow myself to think NHRA cares one bit about what I think because they don't, and I'm not a former champion and one of the most popular drivers ever.
Seriously?
When's the last time you checked NHRA.com? Both NHRA.com and National Dragster have been loaded with stories about Goo$e As well as the TV show paying tribute. Here's just a sample. And they did the same for Glidden.
Alan


01:32 Legendary Top Fuel and Funny Car racer Tom "the Mongoose" McEwen passes away
Tom “the Mongoose” McEwen, one of the iconic figures in drag racing history, died June 10. He was 81. McEwen, voted No. 16 on NHRA's Top 50 Drivers lists in 2001, competed in both

https://www.nhra.com/news/2018/lege...nny-car-racer-tom-mongoose-mcewen-passes-away

Remembering "the Mongoose"
Some of his best racing friends remember Tom "the Mongoose" McEwen in a touching and funny retrospect to one of the most popular drivers in the sport's history.

https://www.nhra.com/news/2018/remembering-mongoose
Tom McEwen: A pictorial look back
Drag racing Tom “the Mongoose” McEwen passed way June 10. Here’s a brief look back at some of the highlights of his long and successful career. Although he became nationally f

https://www.nhra.com/news/2018/tom-mcewen-pictorial-look-back

https://www.nhra.com/news/2018/tom-mcewen-his-own-words
 

Nunz

Nitro Member
#28
NHRA isn’t perfect, and we all have ideas as to what can be done differently or better. But I swear, it seems like some folks hate on NHRA at every opportunity, without thinking it through, or taking time to learn the facts.
 
#29
Very true, they do make the rules. However, some of your examples are not really accurate. Jet cars never ran what today's T/F cars run speed-wise and I still remember NHRA's idea of exhibition cars as filler from a few years ago at Sears Point. They had local celebrities running rental cars while waiting for the final round. It took over an hour and was boring as hell. By comparison, when Pinks came to town in the same year, they had Bob Bunker's incredible '55, a couple other west coast door slammers and a couple jet dragsters running as hour long filler between races. NOBODY left their seat for that. NHRA has no clue how to promote the best racing on earth and for that they should be ashamed of themselves. You don't need nitro in the tank to please fans, look at the current craze of no prep racing. Yes, it's stupid not to use traction compound, but I'd bet the attraction is that the cars actually look like what they are! It is for me. Some hillbillys from Oklahoma figured out nobody cares about cartoon cars but the suits in Glendora can't? Same with people, fans care about their heroes and want someone they can relate to. Larry Dixon is racing history, both from his accomplishments and his dad's. Same with Mike Dunn. Yet how much time did NHRA spend working with either of them to benefit the fans interest? My guess is not much. Drag racing was founded on outside the box thinking, yet there's been no innovative cars in years. Look at cars like Swamp Rat 30, Swamp Rat 14, Gary Ormsby's Streamliner, Jim Dunn's rear engine F/C and tell me I'm wrong. More recently, look at Rick Santo's SBC T/AD, it dominated, then it was outlawed. Can't have any original thinking. I realize this has little or nothing to do with Dixon's car, but it's just how I see NHRA strong-arming creativity. The thing wasn't used in competition, hell there's an Indy car just like it, plus the Richard Petty thing in Vegas, so what's the big deal? Just my opinion, I could be wrong...

Oh boy, here we go.

The jet example is extremely accurate and this is where you start showing your hand, Jim. If you have no idea what Roger Gustin did to get jet cars back into the NHRA, you need to educate yourself. Yes, the NHRA banned jet cars in the 1970s and it was Gustin who worked very closely with the NHRA to establish standards and construction regulations for the cars, which to that point were wild west affairs with no consistency. These are facts.

Continuing on with the lack of knowledge on how to promote the sport, apparently you have missed the memo on the sellouts we have had this year? If NHRA continues on this path of promotional failure, who knows what'll happen?! Betcha the doors get blown down at Epping this weekend, adding to an already impressive pile that includes some of the largest venues on the tour. I'm chomping my nails like Olive Oyl over here.

Speaking of having no clue, are you aware of what the NHRA has been doing for the last couple seasons with exhibition programs featuring some of the biggest names in the world of grudge, no prep, and drag radial racing? Yeah, no kidding! We have had a bunch of grudge and no prep racers out from series like Shannon Morgan's Redemption and the West Coast Hot Rod Association already, we have Bodie's group back in Sonoma and we have the West Coast Grudge group coming to Seattle. Proud to say I have had a hand in that program and it has been awesome to see the response on both side of the drag racing fence. Oh yeah, some of the fastest street legal drag iron in the world will be playing for the fans in Denver as well.

"There's been no innovative cars in years!" -- So we are going to assume that the torrent of performance records and accomplishments levied by teams over the last few seasons involved NO innovation? Just the same old tired junk and not an original thought in anyone's head. Hell, they got lucky! C'amon man. For starters you meant to specify Swamp Rat 32 as the car in your example. 30 was the car that was raced for about a season and was the one that blew over at E-Town. 32 is the mono-strut car I am sure you are referencing...a car that did not perform to Big's expectations, BTW. Using Ormsby's streamliner, not a success, and a rear engine funny car as your examples don't really help the case either as neither of them were rip roaring designs. Dunn winning one race is not exactly a reason to cut up a front engine funny car and "make the switch". I think Dave Bowman won an open funny car show in the California Stud as well, so there's two. Ormsby's car made one final and it lost to Garlits in that single appearance.

Rick Santos did not "dominate" in the small block car. It was good and it won divisional and national events but all of his championships came in the Oakwood Homes car owned by Jack O'Bannon powered by a...wait for it....waaaaaaait for it.....non-innovative Brad Anderson Hemi. The spectre of the 1,600lb small block car has grown over the years. The thing was boss but facts are facts here, man. Also, you need to get Dale Hall in on the small block TAD conversation if you are going to go that route as well.

Go ahead and wander through the pro stock pits, the alky pits, and the nitro pits and tell the people down there that there is no original thinking going on. Lemme know how that works out for you.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but not their own facts.

Brian
 
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Dennis

Nitro Member
#30
For starters you meant to specify Swamp Rat 32 as the car in your example. 30 was the car that was raced for about a season and was the one that blew over at E-Town.
I'm pretty sure the reference to Swamp Rat XXX was accurate. It raced for over 1.5 seasons and was innovative in the sense that it brought together a few different concepts. Small tires up front which were enclosed, enclosed cockpit and even the rear wing was laid back quite dramatically compared to other cars of that period. I believe the reference is that up until about the early 90's people were allowed to try things outside of the cookie cutter car of today. Garlits' website details all Swamp Rats and makes for a great read if you have a few minutes to spare. I would assume that the original argument was that we've seen the last of the Garlits', Ormsby's, I'd even throw Joe Amato in there - people willing to try something different. But by the same token the NHRA is a business and they make the rules for better or worse to put on a show. I'm not judging one way or another, just stating that I understand the argument, but also understand NHRA's dillemma.

Also good luck this weekend! I grew up in Massachusetts and I've spent many weekends at NED, my favorite track in the country.
 

Sandman

Nitro Member
#31
Oh boy, here we go.

The jet example is extremely accurate and this is where you start showing your hand, Jim. If you have no idea what Roger Gustin did to get jet cars back into the NHRA, you need to educate yourself. Yes, the NHRA banned jet cars in the 1970s and it was Gustin who worked very closely with the NHRA to establish standards and construction regulations for the cars, which to that point were wild west affairs with no consistency. These are facts.

Continuing on with the lack of knowledge on how to promote the sport, apparently you have missed the memo on the sellouts we have had this year? If NHRA continues on this path of promotional failure, who knows what'll happen?! Betcha the doors get blown down at Epping this weekend, adding to an already impressive pile that includes some of the largest venues on the tour. I'm chomping my nails like Olive Oyl over here.

Speaking of having no clue, are you aware of what the NHRA has been doing for the last couple seasons with exhibition programs featuring some of the biggest names in the world of grudge, no prep, and drag radial racing? Yeah, no kidding! We have had a bunch of grudge and no prep racers out from series like Shannon Morgan's Redemption and the West Coast Hot Rod Association already, we have Bodie's group back in Sonoma and we have the West Coast Grudge group coming to Seattle. Proud to say I have had a hand in that program and it has been awesome to see the response on both side of the drag racing fence. Oh yeah, some of the fastest street legal drag iron in the world will be playing for the fans in Denver as well.

"There's been no innovative cars in years!" -- So we are going to assume that the torrent of performance records and accomplishments levied by teams over the last few seasons involved NO innovation? Just the same old tired junk and not an original thought in anyone's head. Hell, they got lucky! C'amon man. For starters you meant to specify Swamp Rat 32 as the car in your example. 30 was the car that was raced for about a season and was the one that blew over at E-Town. 32 is the mono-strut car I am sure you are referencing...a car that did not perform to Big's expectations, BTW. Using Ormsby's streamliner, not a success, and a rear engine funny car as your examples don't really help the case either as neither of them were rip roaring designs. Dunn winning one race is not exactly a reason to cut up a front engine funny car and "make the switch". I think Dave Bowman won an open funny car show in the California Stud as well, so there's two. Ormsby's car made one final and it lost to Garlits in that single appearance.

Rick Santos did not "dominate" in the small block car. It was good and it won divisional and national events but all of his championships came in the Oakwood Homes car owned by Jack O'Bannon powered by a...wait for it....waaaaaaait for it.....non-innovative Brad Anderson Hemi. The spectre of the 1,600lb small block car has grown over the years. The thing was boss but facts are facts here, man. Also, you need to get Dale Hall in on the small block TAD conversation if you are going to go that route as well.

Go ahead and wander through the pro stock pits, the alky pits, and the nitro pits and tell the people down there that there is no original thinking going on. Lemme know how that works out for you.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but not their own facts.

Brian
Thanks for all the new info. I've only been watching drag racing since the late '60's when it was covered by ABC's Wide World of Sports, so I could be wrong, being a newcomer to the sport. I know very well who Roger Gustin is and stand by my statement that I'm not aware of any jet cars running as fast as today's T/F cars. Rocket cars, yes, Jets, no. I could well be wrong, but please let me know where they ran quicker and I'll apologize for that remark.
Also, my comments were aimed primarily at National Events, and I have to drive 7 hours to get to Seattle or Sears Point so excuse me if I kinda hope there will be something new to see in the pits and on the track. Although I love going to see the big show, I was at Seattle in '16 and while the event was great, even with the rain, I didn't see anything new and we actually left early. I can say the highlight of the day was how Don Schumacher treats fans. That man is a class act.
As for my lack of knowledge on how promoting drag racing works, here's how I choose to rate promotion: if I find myself asking "How much longer?" or if my butt hurts from boredom, the promoter sucks. This is exactly what happened during the Sears Point event I mentioned. Local radio personalities or some other such non-racers running rental cars is stuff even my local track doesn't do. If even the great Bob Frey couldn't make it entertaining, then NHRA missed the target on that little time filler.
Innovative cars is another area where I will stand my ground. I never once said all innovative cars were successful, far from it. What they do accomplish is add variety to a class. Variety breeds interest among fans. Cookie-cutter cars do not. Rick Santos car was quite successful, despite what you claim. If it weren't why would the NHRA add weight to only THAT car? Dale Hall's FED was (IIRC) the last front engined car to win a national event. I could be wrong again, but it's not really an issue since FED's were no longer competitive. As for the Garlits cars, trust me, I can count quite well and said what I meant. Swamp Rat XXX is what I said and what I meant. Here's another little tidbit to think about: you are looking at the current NHRA thing from the inside, you see hard working people that put their heart and soul into the end product and I'm sure hearing some random guy bad-mouth your work hurts. I'm looking at it from a paying customer's point of view. I don't fly to the races, I get up early, drive seven hours to the track so I can buy a couple extra T-Shirts for my son and I rather than spend an extra night in a hotel. I pay for my tickets, I stand patiently at the ropes to see my heroes that are typically half my age, then I find a good seat in the GA section hoping not to get sunburned. I love nitro cars and used to like pro/stock back when they looked real. If money's tight, I can't go at all, but watch from TV at home. Why should I not turn the channel?
 

none

Nitro Member
#32
Thanks for all the new info. I've only been watching drag racing since the late '60's when it was covered by ABC's Wide World of Sports, so I could be wrong, being a newcomer to the sport. I know very well who Roger Gustin is and stand by my statement that I'm not aware of any jet cars running as fast as today's T/F cars. Rocket cars, yes, Jets, no. I could well be wrong, but please let me know where they ran quicker and I'll apologize for that remark.
Also, my comments were aimed primarily at National Events, and I have to drive 7 hours to get to Seattle or Sears Point so excuse me if I kinda hope there will be something new to see in the pits and on the track. Although I love going to see the big show, I was at Seattle in '16 and while the event was great, even with the rain, I didn't see anything new and we actually left early. I can say the highlight of the day was how Don Schumacher treats fans. That man is a class act.
As for my lack of knowledge on how promoting drag racing works, here's how I choose to rate promotion: if I find myself asking "How much longer?" or if my butt hurts from boredom, the promoter sucks. This is exactly what happened during the Sears Point event I mentioned. Local radio personalities or some other such non-racers running rental cars is stuff even my local track doesn't do. If even the great Bob Frey couldn't make it entertaining, then NHRA missed the target on that little time filler.
Innovative cars is another area where I will stand my ground. I never once said all innovative cars were successful, far from it. What they do accomplish is add variety to a class. Variety breeds interest among fans. Cookie-cutter cars do not. Rick Santos car was quite successful, despite what you claim. If it weren't why would the NHRA add weight to only THAT car? Dale Hall's FED was (IIRC) the last front engined car to win a national event. I could be wrong again, but it's not really an issue since FED's were no longer competitive. As for the Garlits cars, trust me, I can count quite well and said what I meant. Swamp Rat XXX is what I said and what I meant. Here's another little tidbit to think about: you are looking at the current NHRA thing from the inside, you see hard working people that put their heart and soul into the end product and I'm sure hearing some random guy bad-mouth your work hurts. I'm looking at it from a paying customer's point of view. I don't fly to the races, I get up early, drive seven hours to the track so I can buy a couple extra T-Shirts for my son and I rather than spend an extra night in a hotel. I pay for my tickets, I stand patiently at the ropes to see my heroes that are typically half my age, then I find a good seat in the GA section hoping not to get sunburned. I love nitro cars and used to like pro/stock back when they looked real. If money's tight, I can't go at all, but watch from TV at home. Why should I not turn the channel?

OK Jim,

Rick Santos Small Block Car was awesome, and did win some races including Indy. And it was fun to watch the basically 7/8 scale car knocking off the hitters of the day. Much like the Boggs Brothers front engine car. But it wasn't outlawed, or even singled out, there was a rule change that was based in part on some people trying to take advantage of the weight break for a "True Inline Wedge" and Rick kind of got caught in the cross fire. But I think his run was pretty much at an end anyway as his combo was tapped out, and the others were still finding gains. And as Brian pointed out, he went on to tremendous success with Jack O'Bannon and the Oakwood Homes car.

The only time I remember a radio station race in rental cars would be the "Race The Bud King" promotion that we did for a while, where the radio station would promote the heck out of the race for weeks then have their guy (or gal) race against a contest winner, and that winner would race Brandon. That took about 6 minutes. It was a good deal for NHRA. And hasn't happened since the Budweiser deal went away years ago.

Sonoma for years has run a Top the Cops program as part of Pre-Finals, and I don't see that stopping anytime soon. The good will generated in the community is too great to give up, and the fans seem to enjoy when the kids beat the cops. They certainly don't "Boo" And it's usually 8 to 10 pair of cars and is over in 15 minutes including awards for the cops.

You say you left Seattle early because there was nothing new, what about old? The Seattle Cacklefest is one of the best historical tributes all year. If you left before that you missed a heck of a show.

And since you have been around since the early days, and like the Nitro cars, you have to appreciate that the NHRA has a schedule in place where you can come out and see them without spending 14 hours at the track if you don't want to. And even the Sunday show is now starting at 11 (most places) and finish by 4-4:30 simply because the fans didn't want to have to stay until after dark to find out who won.

As for the innovation, it's still there, but much more subtle, things like the headers a couple of years back. As time goes by everyone figured out that the best way to go is the best way to go. So if you're hoping to see a front engine Top Fuel car, or a rear engine Funny Car you are going to continue to be disappointed, because long ago it was proven that, that's not as good as what we are doing now.

Times Change, I'm willing to bet that whatever you do for a living has changed drastically over the years as well.

Alan
 

Nunz

Nitro Member
#33
Your post kind of beat me to the punch Alan. The days of going to the races, or hell even opening National Dragster, and seeing some radical new concept are pretty much over. And that is a fact of modern Motorsports, not just drag racing. Motorsport of all types has been around for a century. I’d call that a mature sport. Having said that, there isn’t another form of racing that will give you the variety of machinery that drag racing will, even today.
 
#34
Jet cars can and have run the mph top fuel and funny cars do but it is frowned on due to safety. I don't see a need for exhibition cars to keep pushing and run any faster than they do now.
 

Sandman

Nitro Member
#35
Alan, I appreciate your comments, and I'm not oblivious or ignorant to technological improvements. While I don't get as much of a charge over seeing big numbers on the board as I do good racing, I understand progress is unstoppable. What I am sad to see is unidentifiable funny cars, one brand, make and model of pro stockers that don't resemble "stock" and interchangeable dragsters.
The rental car fiasco happened around '98 at Sonoma if I remember correctly and I can assure you, Brandon B. was NOT in any of the cars and it took a lot longer than 15 minutes.
I loved seeing the Assassin dragster in Seattle a couple years ago and hearing it run was cool, but that happened right around the National Anthem, right? I saw that car later in the day and it was covered up due to the on-again, off-again showers that year. Despite my complaining I'll be there again this year with my son because it's the best sport on earth and I love drag racing. Plus I need to update my wardrobe with more racing shirts, lol.
Innovation is relative I guess. I don't get excited by header angles or the latest burst panel design. I'd love to see less front overhang on funny cars, or pro stockers that fit a stock body template. But I don't make the rules.
As for my job, you'd be surprised. I actually help keep S64 Skycranes flying, saving property and lives around the world. So my love of old cars is just like my love of 50 year old aircraft.
I can't help what I like, but I know it when I see it.
 

Cliff

Nitro Member
#37
In all the years I've been going to the drags, Pro Comp is the one class that I really loved. The variety of cars was just unreal. Funny car Vs dragster, front engined, rear engined, injected on nitro, blown gas, altereds. Guys like Ken Veney and Dale Armstrong, just to name 2 out of a LOT of really great racers. OK, that's long gone. So where is the variety today? I think it's door cars. The 1/8 mile series is really drawing a lot of interest. Pro Mod, nitrous classes, outlaw street, 10.5, 632 class, on and on. All heads up, tight racing, great show. It's almost like the Pro Comp of today, if you will. I watch most of those races on live feeds on the computer and it's a great show. So, there is still innovation & variety; it's just in a different format. By the way, I think Top Dragster is really interesting, just because of all the different combos that are run. Jus' my 2 cents...... :)
 
#38
Interesting reading.


Yup... pass some o' dat corn over here....

my experience at the NHRA National events has been this....
Jet cars fire up at end of eliminations, causing everybody to run towards their cars in the parking lot to beat the trafffic out...major traffic jam occurs as the jets cross the finish line
 
#39
Alan and Brian,

Let's get back to the original topic and down to the brass tacks. Why has this situation with LD floundered? Like has been pointed out, virtually every other form of racing has some sort of ride along program, so what's the hold up here? And when I say that, I mean what's the ACTUAL hold up? My guess would be, at least in part, ego(s).

This was touched on in another thread a while back, but it still deserves some constructive discussion. I might be wrong, but there is absolutely no way in hell will I ever believe somebody like Larry Dixon ventured into this project with so much malice towards the NHRA that he intentionally tried to slide a subpar chassis past the powers-that-be; NO WAY. Did he go into it excited about the prospect, a little gunny and ultimately naïve? Maybe/probably. But malicious? After the initial confrontation it may have elevated itself to that, but began that way with intent? Nah.

Somebody, whether it's either of you or somebody else, is going to have to work awfully hard to convince me this deal couldn't have been handled much more diplomatically than it was, and not ended with such a quick and nasty dismissal of his competition privileges. Personally, I think this is a great idea. Even if it's just a pit set-up where you can get in the car for a warm-up/seating the clutch session.

What gives?

Sean D
 

DrRocket

Nitro Member
#40
Yup... pass some o' dat corn over here....

my experience at the NHRA National events has been this....
Jet cars fire up at end of eliminations, causing everybody to run towards their cars in the parking lot to beat the trafffic out...major traffic jam occurs as the jets cross the finish line
I wouldn't know anything about the traffic jams, as I always stick around for the jets. I'm one of those who's never "bolted for the exits" at event end.
 

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